Community and Individual Health

Community and Individual Health

I want to revisit a topic I blogged about a couple years ago exploring the idea of “treating a community like a patient”.  Though I still agree with the philosophy, practice and experience have evolved my opinion on the matter. 

In November 2015 I wrote as general advice (and specific advice to my future self):

“Trust in the innate capacity of the Nepalese people to heal their own communities.  They may have been shaken, but they’re resilient and know what’s best for their families.  Look for obstacles you can help to remove.  Consider what tools and skills they’ll need to support their recovery. Empower them to take control of their own development.”

The Art of Failing Well

The Art of Failing Well

I’ll bet you agree that it is better to try then fail, than not to try at all.  So my new skill I’m developing in 2018 is the ability to gracefully accept my failures at things I care about, then get right back up to try again.  AKA getting good at being bad at good stuff.  Needless to say, the ultimate objective is to overcome that initial troublesome hurdle on your path to pursuing any worthy goal.  What makes the leap so scary you’d rather just not go there? What stops you from being bolder in your choices?  That's the bit I'd like to chip away at this year.   

Nepal Elections 2017

Nepal Elections 2017

Since 1990, Nepal has had 26 governments.  Think about that for a minute.  26 different governments in 27 years.  It is no great wonder why the people of Nepal have grown exhaustively accustomed to great instability that is stifling to economic development, infrastructure investment and any coherent strategy for moving forward.  It is through that lens that we look at the current elections that usher in the formation of a new and hopefully stable government built on the principles of federalism to create the new Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal.

Free healthcare! At what cost?

Free healthcare!  At what cost?

Imagine you live in the mountains of Nepal, and you’ve had chronic stomach pain for years.  There’s no doctor in your town, so you saved up money to travel the 8 hours to Kathmandu to see one.  It helped for a while, but the pain came back.  You plan to just bear it, until one day you hear on the radio that foreign doctors are coming to town with free medicine to give to anyone who is sick!  You wake up early and walk 5 hours, wait 2 hours in line with hundreds of people, see the specialist for 5 minutes, then get some medicine in time to make the 5 hour walk back home before dark.  This is a typical health camp experience.

Sustainable Development Goals

Sustainable Development Goals

September marked the 2nd birthday of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  The 17 SDGs are an answer to the question “How can we end poverty, protect the planet, and promote peace and prosperity for all?”  In September 2015, more than 150 world leaders came together at the UN Development Summit to adopt these ambitious global goals and their associated targets and indicators. The goals incorporated the lessons learned from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of 2000, the first iteration of a concerted global effort of this kind.